Enrique Martínez Celaya

Enrique Martínez Celaya

“At this stage, I have been writing and thinking about what’s going on without trying to control it,” Martínez Celaya says standing with half his body facing the painting and the other toward me. He contends that “The Promise of the Most Whole” and much of the works in “The Tears of Things,” are more focused on “the land, and more about journey, and risk and transformation,” while the sea was a dominant motif in “The Mariner’s Meadow” at Blain|Southern, London. Presenting the roaring ocean in shades of gold, the painting titled “The Second Sign,” is a continuation in the artist’s preoccupation with gold.

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Tony Berlant - Artnews

Tony Berlant - Artnews

I was already impressed by the paintings of Dick Diebenkorn when I first saw him in a photograph through a magnifying glass in a magazine article that showed him in his studio. I saw a calm but determined alchemist. The image invoked for me the vision of an artist working in such a space finding pleasure in the ability to create art as a manifestation of oneself. Work that would not just exist but live on, filled with the presence of its maker.

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Sharon Ellis - California Desert Art

Sharon Ellis - California Desert Art

During a fifth grade field trip in 1966, Sharon Ellis’ class shuffled into the San Diego Museum of Art and listened dutifully as a docent told the children why they should admire a painting featuring a young girl as the subject. Sharon wasn’t so sure. She decided she didn’t like the painting–or the girl in the painting.

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Wallace Berman - KCRW

Wallace Berman - KCRW

Wallace Berman had an almost shaman-like impact on people. Private to the point of paranoia, he avoided interviews or having his own photograph taken, though he repeatedly photographed his wife and son. In 1976, he was killed in a car crash with a drunk driver in Topanga on his 50th birthday.

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María Berrío - Los Angeles Times

María Berrío - Los Angeles Times

New York artist María Berrío’s dream-like collages at Kohn Gallery are ecstatically beautiful. The eight works on view depict figures — mostly women who look vaguely mestiza — in intimate settings, either indoors or in expansive natural landscapes. Nothing much is happening, but Berrío’s intricate collage technique animates the works’ surfaces, making them crackle with energy.

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María Berrío - Town & Country

María Berrío - Town & Country


Linda Nochlin’s seminal 1971 essay, ‘Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?’, is the inspiration behind the art historian and curator Katy Hessel’s Instagram account @greatwomenartists, founded in 2015, which celebrates creative women through the ages. Now, Hessel has joined forces with Victoria Miro to launch an inspiring new exhibition featuring three female artists – María Berrío, Caroline Walker and Flora Yukhnovich – each of whom reinterprets art history through the perspective of contemporary womanhood.

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María Berrío - Interview

María Berrío - Interview

To glance at a María Berrío work is to immerse oneself in a multi-textural wonderland, a vivid colorscape where women reign eternal—with cacti around their necks, no less. Berrío’s work, which consists of dreamlike collages of Japanese paper and watercolor, retain a unique concoction of hyper-specific textures that elevate the natural world to its hallucinatory imagination.

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María Berrío - FAD

María Berrío - FAD

Based in Brooklyn, María Berrio grew up in Colombia. Her large-scale works, which are meticulously crafted from layers of Japanese paper, reflect on cross-cultural connections and global migration seen through the prism of her own history.

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Heidi Hahn - Artillery

Heidi Hahn - Artillery

Heidi Hahn‘s grandly scaled paintings lend iconic status to plain-Jane women going about quotidian routines. Breezily limned in free-flowing brushstrokes and translucent washes, her anonymous characters appear lost in dreamy, meditative worlds even as they shop, sweep, picnic and scroll through their smartphones.

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Jarvis Boyland - Out

Jarvis Boyland - Out

There’s something different about Jarvis Boyland’s work. Walking the exhibition rooms of Los Angeles’ Kohn Gallery — where Boyland’s “On Hold:” exhibit is on view through Thursday, May 23 — I was arrested by his portraits of Black queer men. Though simple and straightforward, there’s a complexity in the color story, particularly in his subject’s skin tones. They were rich and nuanced and complex, both imagined and realistic, and unlike any paintings I’ve come into contact with.

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Jarvis Boyland - Los Angeles Times

Jarvis Boyland - Los Angeles Times

Diva painting might be its own notable genre, given such exceptional practitioners as Kurt Kauper and Marilyn Minter. Their work doesn’t merely show as vivid, dramatic subject matter an array of imperious opera singers, fashion models, Hollywood icons at home or sex-tape-style celebrities-in-the-making. Instead, it forthrightly asserts that, in an era in which any form of art-making is possible, painting is a diva too.

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Heidi Hahn - Curator

Heidi Hahn - Curator

Heidi Hahn (b. 1982, Los Angeles, CA) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Hahn received her MFA from Yale University in 2014, and her BFA from Cooper Union in 2006. She is an acting Professor of Painting and Drawing at Alfred University, NY and has been the recipient of several awards, residencies, and fellowships, including the Jerome Foundation Grant; Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture Residency, Madison, ME; and the Fine Arts Work Center Residency, Provincetown, MA, among others.

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