Martinez

Eddie Martinez - Artnews

Eddie Martinez - Artnews

Bill Powers: Your drawings were featured in “The Avant Garde Won’t Give Up: Cobra and Its Legacy” at Blum & Poe Los Angeles. How were you first introduced to the movement?

Eddie Martinez: In 2009, I was going to Europe a lot—particularly Denmark—which is where I saw Asger Jorn’s work at the Louisiana Museum. I really fell in love with it.

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Eddie Martinez @ Mitchell-Innes & Nash

Eddie Martinez @ Mitchell-Innes & Nash

Mitchell-Innes & Nash is delighted to present the first exhibition of work by Brooklyn-based painter Eddie Martinez.Salmon Eye, on view in our Chelsea gallery from January 30 through March 5, 2016, will feature roughly eight new paintings.  This will be the first exhibition with the artist since he joined the gallery in 2015, and will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, including an interview withcurator and writer Alison Gingeras.

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Eddie Martinez @ Blum & Poe

THE AVANT-GARDE WON’T GIVE UP: COBRA AND ITS LEGACY
Blum & Poe is pleased to present The Avant-Garde Won’t Give Up: Cobra and Its Legacy, a two-part exhibition taking place in New York and Los Angeles which will offer a broad and critical reassessment of Cobra—an essential postwar European movement named for the home cities Copenhagen, Brussels, and Amsterdam. Blum & Poe, Los Angeles: November 5 – December 23, 2015, Opening reception: Thursday, November 5, 6 – 8 pm. Curated by Alison M. Gingeras

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Eddie Martinez @ Kunstmuseum Bonn

New York Painting, Kunstmuseum Bonn, Bonn, Germany

Although globalization has expanded our knowledge of the artistic production over Europe and America also, the art market scoured even the remotest regions of the world for promising talents, so limit the appeal of the big cities but in any way. Considering only the supply of important artists working in New York, then it turns out that the city has apparently lost none of its appeal.

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Eddie Martinez - Huffington Post

It has been a busy couple of weeks for the medium of painting. I just returned from my annual trip to art world summer camp, aka Art Basel Miami Beach, where thousands of art-hungry viewers were inundated with paintings of every conceivable scale, media and subject matter. Some were good, some were bad, many were derivative and most will be forgotten before the decade ends. On the heels of the various fairs closing, critic and curator Christian Viveros-Faune unleashed a caustic and much passed-around article about art fairs and their negative effect on the type of art currently being produced. He specifically targeted what he calls Zombie Painting, which he identifies as a bland and toothless sort of abstraction that seems to be all the rage. (Jerry Saltz has been beating this same drum for quite a while.)

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Eddie Martinez - Juxtapoz

Art Basel Miami 2014

We are continuing to make the rounds to all the fairs this year in Miami. Yesterday we hit up the main Art Basel Miami fair and said hi to our friends at the Pace Prints booth and and wandered up and down the rows and rows of booths lined with an endless amount of art. We spotted great work from Eddie Martinez, Joyce Pensato, an awesome wall by Ed Templeton, some beautiful David Hockneys, and of course classic Warhols and Harings...

Source: http://www.juxtapoz.com/current/art-basel-...

Eddie Martinez - Ocean Drive

Basel Advice from Art Advisor Mia Romanik

by Hunter Braithwaite

Art advisor Mia Romanik shares her expertise on the financials of collecting art.

With more than $3 billion worth of art on display at last year’s Art Basel and a host of “satellite” art shows taking place all over town, there are treasures to be had at this year’s fairs, but knowing a good “get” when you see one sometimes requires a little help. Mia Romanik is an art advisor who trades in her knowledge of art history and relationships in the art world to help her clients build and maintain collections. Born and raised in Hollywood, Florida, she travels to fairs, galleries, and studios around the world on behalf of her clients.

Who do you think are four artists to watch at this year’s Art Basel in Miami Beach?
Cory Arcangel explores our society’s rapid pace of consumption through obsolete technologies and cultural ephemera. His work operates as a time capsule of our generation.
Represented by Team Gallery in New York and Lisson Gallery in London and Milan.

Jonas Wood’s paintings of domestic interiors, televised sports, houseplants, and sports trading cards turn moments from the artist’s life into kaleidoscopic collages of color, shape, and pattern.
Represented by Anton Kern in New York, David Kordansky in Los Angeles, and Shane Campbell in Chicago.

Eddie Martinez is masterful with paint, both technically and through his knowledge of art history.
Shows with Kohn Gallery in Los Angeles and Timothy Taylor in London.

The works of Tony Lewis, an African-American artist based out of Chicago, revolve around text, with a connection to other language-oriented artists such as Ligon, Kruger, and Holzer.
Shows with Shane Campbell and Massimo de Carlo.

Are more people collecting because of a love for art or because they see it as any other type of financial investment?
People collect for all different reasons, with a love for art always being the platform to start on. However, there has been a lot of investment opportunity for art over the past few years.

Is there a risk of art depreciating in value?
Collecting and investing in art should be based on passion for the work, but as with any other investment, there is risk involved. Art is hard to buy and often hard to sell, too.

How do your younger clients behave in comparison to the older generation?
Younger clients are definitely more excited by the investment opportunity side of this business. Older clients are a bit more comfortable in what they are looking to achieve with their collection and its focus.

 

Eddie Martinez @ Phoenix Art Museum

Vanitas refers to the futility of achievement, love, knowledge, riches.

In the 14th century, the pandemic of plague commonly known as the Black Death killed somewhere between 30 to 60% of the total population of Europe. It took the continent about 150 years to recover from this devastation, marking deeply the continent’s culture and imagination. 

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Eddie Martinez - Frame Web

Eddie Martinez - Frame Web

Talking reggae and huffing marker pens with the Brooklyn-based painter

New York-based Eddie Martinez paints huge, brightly coloured canvases, often imbued with a sense of menace against black backdrops and harsh spray painted lines. His older works depict a messy, cartoonish version of the world, filled with bulbous figures and wobbly still life, and the artist’s recent move into abstraction is a little like that style being turned up to a hundred percent. Scribbles still feature heavily, spooned by bold primary colours, and the two combine to create a sense of youthful agitation that cannot help but enthuse. 

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Eddie Martinez - Blouin ArtInfo

Eddie Martinez - Blouin ArtInfo

After “Matador,” a 2013 exhibition at the Journal Gallery in Brooklyn, Eddie Martinez sort of hated paint. “I had a negative reaction, I got really turned off by it,” said the artist, who found himself avoiding the studio after completing the works in the aforementioned show: Large, quasi-abstract canvases that serially explored the contours of a Picasso-esque bull. To deal with his creative block, Martinez started walking the beach on the North Fork of Long Island during the summer, pondering if three-dimensional work might be the way forward. “I wanted to do sculpture,” he explained, “but I didn’t know how to do it.” The answer turned out to be fairly simple: Gather whatever weird or evocative materials are discovered underfoot, and combine them in ramshackle, brightly colored configurations.

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Eddie Martinez - Supertouch

One of our favorite young abstract painters here at Supertouch is Brooklyn-based artist Eddie Martinez, whose show of gorgeous new work, Nomader, at Kohn Gallerycould easily be mistaken for a MoMA retrospective if you managed to forget what building you walked into. At the tender age of just 37, he's an absolute powerhouse on a fast track to achieving Modern Master status with his gorgeous abstract paintings & sulptures with deep roots in midcentury AbEx.

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Eddie Martinez - Interview Magazine

Eddie Martinez - Interview Magazine

It's not hard to like Eddie," says artist Barry McGee, of fellow artist Eddie Martinez. "Everything was already great." McGee first met Martinez when the latter was an art handler working to install McGee's show at a Boston gallery. Martinez was a bit starstruck: "It completely blew our minds because it was obvious that Barry was in town... then he had that show and just really kind of rocked our worlds for a while," remembers Martinez of himself and his art-school friends. "We went to it all the time. I took my mom to it."

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Eddie Martinez - Widewalls

Eddie Martinez - Widewalls

The beauty of urban art is reflected, among other things, in the specific individual characteristics of artists, those who are destined to be contemporary drifters, people who belong to the world. It can be said that the identity of a contemporary artist is always of a nomadic nature. The nomad we are talking about here says that he gets into a shamanic state when painting and that sometimes he would grab just about anything what is next to him and use it. His name is Eddie Martinez…

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Eddie Martinez - Flaunt

Eddie Martinez - Flaunt

Nowadays, most of us chronicle the moments between point A and point B through convenient, mostly digital means of communication: a tweet from a cab, an Instagram of a stripped-down apartment filled with boxes. But for Brooklyn artist Eddie Martinez’ Nomader exhibit—which premieres at the Kohn Gallery in Los Angeles in September—little output saw such convenience. His full-body, multi-layer production of big paintings goes on uninterrupted, despite constant changes in location of the unfinished objets d’art. 

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Eddie Martinez @ ArtCrush

PREVIEWCRUSH | Thursday, July 31, 5–7 pm
Hosted by Baldwin Gallery
Preview of live and select silent auction works and cocktails.

PREVIEW EXTRA | Thursday, July 31, 5–7 pm
Hosted by Casterline | Goodman Gallery

Both Preview locations will have cocktails and light fare to kick-off this year’s
ArtCrush auction.

ArtCrush | Friday, August 1, 2014 at 6 pm

Eddie Martinez,  Untitled , 2013, oil and spray paint on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

Eddie Martinez, Untitled, 2013, oil and spray paint on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

Prominent artists, art collectors, curators, gallery owners, celebrities, and philanthropists from around the world gather in Aspen every year during the first week in August to celebrate the Aspen Art Museum. Featuring a celebrated wine tasting and auction, seated dinner for 350 guests, live and silent auctions of major works of contemporary art, and the presentation of the AAM’s Aspen Award for Art to 2014 artist nominee Ernesto Neto, ArtCrush is the preeminent party of the summer season. Join us for this unique event that provides an opportunity to support the Aspen Art Museum by combining art, wine, and philanthropy.

For reservations call 970.925.8050.

Click here to bid online at Paddle8 by July 31

Source: http://aspenartmuseum.org/event/artcrush20...

Eddie Martinez - The New York Observer

Periodically, sneakingly, the romantic figure of the brooding, hypermasculine painter resurfaces in the New York art world. He works alone in his studio, wrestling with his canvases. Eddie Martinez, who was born in 1977, is one of the most promising artists of his generation in that mold. He has made his name in the past few years creating, with ostensible effortlessness, messy yet sophisticated paintings that feature bug-eyed figures in craggy landscapes. His current show, at The Journal Gallery, represents a dramatic shift.

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Eddie Martinez - ArtForum

The title of Eddie Martinez’s exhibition, “Matador,” characterizes his new paintings as the outcome of a brute encounter between man and beast. These brawny canvases—measuring seven by ten feet apiece—burst with hastily applied spray paint, arbitrarily collaged gum wrappers and baby wipes, and viscous oil paint scraped and smudged with a wide palette knife and housepainter’s brush. The artist even defaces his impasto surfaces with an electric disc sander. Also demonstrable are the influences of Picasso and Miró, with whom Martinez shares a love of bold color, painterly gestures, and cartoonish forms, as well as the immediacy of illicit graffiti. What is unusual amid this macho expressiveness is the fact that all five paintings included in the show look more or less alike.

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